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hankgood
I have retrieved many files from a Mac running OS 7.5. Most are graphic files created is QuarkXpress, Photoshop and Illustrator.

All of the files show in the Finder list "kind" column (in macos 10.11.6) as being "Unix executable".

I can manually add the appropriate three letter extension to any of these and they will open with that application.

The trouble is that I'm not sure which app any particular file was created in. I would like to identify the the creating app through HoudahSpot but i'm having no luck. I downloaded an archived list of MAC (classic) creator codes and found the codes XDOC and XPR3 for Quark file but neither returns anything in a Houdah search.

Any Ideas.
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houdah
Hi!

If I remember correctly, Mac OS X completely dropped support for creator codes a couple of years ago. It works from file extensions and maps these to Uniform Type Itentifiers (UTIs) to place type is a hierarchy of similar types.

Try “file” command on the command line in Terminal.app. It may be able to determine the type of a file. You can then rename the file to add the appropriate extension.

Best,

Pierre Bernard
Houdah Software s.à r.l.

Houdah Software s. à r. l.
https://www.houdah.com

HoudahGeo: One-stop photo geocoding
HoudahSpot: Advanced file search utility
Tembo: Easy and effective file search
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hankgood
Shouldn't these files have the original OS9 metadata embedded?

When I search using the Query Attributes "Content Creator" or "Creator Code" shouldn't these file be found?

Using version 3.9.10

Thanks

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houdah
Hi!

“Content Creator” is the name of the application that created the file.

A search for “Creator Code” is “MACS” does find a couple of files on my Mac running El Capitan. It appears these are old files. So it seems creator codes are preserved when upgrading the OS. I don’t know if creator codes are preserved when copying files from OS9 to OS X.

You can use Terminal to check if your files have a creator code:

  1. Open /Applications/Utilities/Terminal.app
  2. Type “mdls “. With the trailing space, but without the quotes
  3. Drag a file from Finder to the Terminal window. This will add its path to the command
  4. Press Return / Enter
  5. Terminal will list metadata Spotlight has for the file. Look for “kMDItemFSCreatorCode” 

If creator codes did not make it through, the “file” command should be able to help determine the file type:
  1. Open /Applications/Utilities/Terminal.app
  2. Type “file “. With the trailing space, but without the quotes
  3. Drag a file from Finder to the Terminal window. This will add its path to the command
  4. Press Return / Enter
  5. Terminal will show what the file command was able to learn from your file.

Best,

Pierre Bernard
Houdah Software s.à r.l.

Houdah Software s. à r. l.
https://www.houdah.com

HoudahGeo: One-stop photo geocoding
HoudahSpot: Advanced file search utility
Tembo: Easy and effective file search
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